Career Profiles

Explore profiles of real professionals and students to learn how they got started, what they love about computing, and all about the fascinating work they do.
Eur Ing Sam Raincock

Eur Ing Sam Raincock

Director, Information Security Consultant and Expert Witness, Durham, United Kingdom

Degree(s):

BSc (Hons) – First. University of Durham
MSc (by Research). University of Durham
“Strive to study at the best university you can. Do not specialize until after your degree. Studying computer science will leave your options open for better job opportunities.”

I work as a forensic scientist providing expert services in IT, security and telecommunications cases within the UK and Ireland. This involves all types of legal matters in which I provide advice involving anything from a USB stick to cell site analysis. I also provide forensics and information security consultancy to the private sector including responding to incidents (hacking, internal issues etc.).

Information security/forensics provides a great deal of variety. Every day I am provided with problems from which I need to formulate accurate solutions which may involve writing some bespoke software or researching something I have not seen before.

I was instructed to investigate the computer evidence in a murder case. Upon examining the computer of the alleged murderer, it became apparent that there were potentially two persons using the computer since there appeared to be different types of usage at different times. I explored this hypothesis further and determined that keylogger software had been installed (software which logs the entered keystrokes from the user keyboard) correlating with a specific pattern of usage. At a later time, a second keylogger was installed which appeared to correlate with a different pattern of usage. Since the first keylogger was logging all activity, the installation of a second keylogger was known to the initial user. This ended up being the motive for the murder.

I enjoy many hobbies from windsurfing to reading. I particularly enjoy cooking and dining out in order to sample different types of foods and flavors. I also love to travel to diverse places, meeting new people and experiencing the different things that life has to offer. I like to be without a computer for a few days!

I have a West Highland White puppy who certainly keeps me on my toes. He is far too intelligent for his own good so I have to keep making up new tricks for him to learn. He’ll do anything for a treat!

Computer forensics

Mobile telephone mast – cell site analysis

My dog

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Explore profiles of real professionals and students to learn how they got started, what they love about computing, and all about the fascinating work they do.

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CGA palette
Mark Dean

If you have ever used a PC with a color display you have been acquainted with the work of Mark Dean. After achieving a Bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Tennessee, Dean began his career at IBM. Dean served as the chief engineer on the team that developed the first IBM PC, for which he currently holds one third of the patents. With colleague Dennis Moeller, he developed the Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) systems bus, which enabled peripheral devices such as printers, keyboards, and modems to be directly connected to computers, making them both affordable and practical. He also developed the Color Graphics Adapter which allowed for color display on the PC. Most recently, Dean spearheaded the team that developed the one-gigahertz processor chip. Dean went on to obtain a MSEE from Florida Atlantic University and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, has been inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame, and is the first African-American IBM Fellow.

Liz Gerber - Image credit Lisa Beth Anderson
Liz Gerber
Liz Gerber - Image credit Lisa Beth Anderson

Liz Gerber earned her MS and PhD in Product Design and Management Science and Engineering at Stanford. She specializes in design and human-computer interaction, particularly how social computing supports the innovation process. Her current research investigates crowd-funding as a mechanism for reducing disparities in entrepreneurship.
Gerber's work funded by the US National Science Foundation and the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance has appeared in peer-reviewed journals, including Transactions on Computer Human Interactions, Design Studies, and Organization Science.
As an award-winning teacher and researcher, Liz has touched the lives of more than 6,000 students through her teaching at Northwestern's Segal Design Institute and Stanford University's Hasso Plattner's Institute of Design and through her paradigm-shifting creation, Design for America, a national network of students using design to tackle social challenges.

Image credit - Lisa Beth Anderson

Router
Sandra Lerner

It is difficult to imagine a time when computers were not capable of sharing information and resources with great ease. Sandra Lerner pushed the boundaries of network computing as one of the co-founders of Cisco Systems, which introduced one of the first commercially viable routers. The router was born while Sandra was working at Stanford University in the 1980’s after earning her Master’s degree there in Computer Science. To avoid the tedious task of transferring information between computers using floppy disks, she and co-founder of Cisco, Leonard Bosack, created a local area network, or LAN, between their campus offices using a multiprotocol router that Bosack developed. Shortly thereafter the pair started Cisco Systems, and began selling the router which was a success, because it could work with so many different types of computers. After Leaving Cisco in 1990, Lerner started the trendy cosmetics company Urban Decay and became a philanthropist and avid activist for animal rights.

Cursor
James Dammann

If you have used a word processor today, moved your mouse on your laptop, dragged an object around on your smartphone, or highlighted a section of text on your tablet, you can thank Jim Dammann. In 1961 during his second year at IBM and just one year after completing his PhD, Jim created the concept of what today we all take for granted -- the cursor. This idea he documented in utilizing the cursor within word processing operations.

After retiring from IBM, Jim went on to inspire future generations of software engineers at Florida Atlantic University. His work there too demonstrated his creativity for he spent considerable effort enhancing their software engineering program by integrating ideas and feedback from local industries into the University curricular. Today, Jim lives in the Westlake Hills west of Austin Texas and spends most of his time in his art studio. He wrote and published The Opaque Decanter, a collection of poems about art, which provided a new view at part of art history.

Punch card from a COBOL program
Jean Sammet

Jean E. Sammet was one of the first developers and researchers in programming languages. During the 1950’s - 1960’s she supervised the first scientific programming group for Sperry Gyroscope Co. and served as a key member of the original COBOL (COmmon Business-Oriented Language) committee at Sylvania Electric Products. She also taught one of the first graduate programming courses in the country at Adelphi College. After joining IBM in 1961, she developed and directed the first FORMAC (FORmula MAnipulation Compiler). This was the first widely used general language and system for manipulating nonnumeric algebraic expressions. In 1979 she began handling Ada activities for IBM’s Federal Systems Division. Ada is a structured, object-oriented high-level computer programming language, designed for large, long-lived applications, where reliability and efficiency are paramount. Jean has a B.A. from Mount Holyoke College and an M.A. from the University of Illinois, both in Mathematics. She received an honorary D.Sc. from Mount Holyoke (1978).

Image credits