Career Profiles

Explore profiles of real professionals and students to learn how they got started, what they love about computing, and all about the fascinating work they do.
Gostin

Jill Gostin

Senior Research Scientist, Atlanta, United States

Degree(s):

Master of Science in Mathematics, Georgia Institute of Technology
Bachelor of Arts (mathematics), Greenville College
“Never be afraid to try something new. Opportunities don’t always just “appear”, sometimes you have to make them happen. Joining a professional society in whatever field you choose will help you create those opportunities!”

I loved math and numbers from birth, I think; I remember, maybe in kindergarten, being given a 3rd grade math workbook as a birthday present, and thinking it was the best present ever! During my elementary thru high school years, computers were becoming a bigger part of society. As I started college as a math major, it was a natural thing for me to include computer classes; I ended up with a minor in computer science. Those classes were a big selling point on my resume, and as I began my career, computers were integral to everything I did. Now, after many years in my field, my reliance on computing has expanded. High-performance computing hardware and software is essential to the system and software development and testing I do.

My day begins getting my kids off to school, driving to work thru the wonderful Atlanta traffic, then I start my day at work reviewing all the emails that came in overnight. Throughout the day, I manage programs, write proposals, design experiments to test software, run those experiments (sometimes in millions of runs), and assess the results. I write papers and presentations based on my assessments. I try to keep up with emails throughout the day, and at the end of each day I leave myself a list of things that need to be done the next day.

My major was mathematics; my job title is currently “Senior Research Scientist”. I enjoy the fact that I have varying responsibilities throughout each day. The focus of my research has also changed over time. It’s good to have a wide variety of experiences to draw upon. I also like the opportunities I have here to help others; I serve as the Chair of the GTRI Awards Council, helping others get the recognition they deserve for their work.

I began and completed my Master’s Degree while a full-time employee at GTRI. As part of my Master’s Degree program, I took some courses in Fractal Geometry. At that time, researchers were just beginning to explore the many ways that fractal geometry techniques could be applied to real-world applications. Before I graduated, I had to perform and present the results of a research project to the math department. I decided to integrate my work in radar systems with my new understanding of fractal geometry. At the time, I was investigating innovative, automated techniques for deciding what a radar had “seen”, based on the returned radar signature. For my project, I chose to use the Fractal Dimension of the returned signature as a new technique. I tested this technique using measured radar data. The technique was successful, and I was subsequently able to turn that initial research into several funded contracts.

I spend a lot of my free time participating in and volunteering for IEEE activities. I also love to sing, and sing in the Praise Band at my church. I’m an obsessive reader, often reading 4-5 books/ week.

EAB Awards 2013

Gostin

Gostin

2011 Sections Congress

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Douglas Engelbart
Douglas Engelbart

In 1967, Douglas Engelbart applied for a patent for an "X-Y position indicator for a display system," which he and his team developed at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) in Menlo Park, California. The device, a small, wooden box with two metal wheels, was nicknamed a "mouse" because a cable trailing out of the one end resembled a tail.

In addition to the first computer mouse, Engelbart’s team developed computer interface concepts that led to the GUI interface, and were integral to the development of ARPANET--the precursor to today’s Internet. Engelbart received his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Oregon State University in 1948, followed by an MS in 1953 and a Ph.D. in 1955 both from the University of California, Berkeley.

MATLAB graph
Cleve Moler

Cleve Moler improved the quality and accessibility of mathematical software and created a highly respected software system called MATLAB. He was a professor of mathematics and computer science for almost 20 years at the University of Michigan, Stanford University, and the University of New Mexico. In the late 1970’s to early 1980’s he developed several mathematical software packages to support computational science and engineering. These packages eventually formed the basis of MATLAB, a programming environment for algorithm development, data analysis, visualization, and numerical computation. MATLAB can be used to solve technical computing problems faster than with traditional programming languages, such as C, C++, and Fortran. Today, Professor Moler spends his time writing books, articles, and MATLAB programs.

Listen to what Professor Moler has to say about his life’s work: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IT5umwNSAxE

RISC processor
John Hennessy
John Hennessy

Have you ever wondered how computers can execute complex commands in mere seconds? John Hennessy is a pioneer of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architecture which employs small, highly-optimized sets of instructions to greatly enhance computer performance. He was instrumental in transferring the technology, specifically MIPS RISC architecture, to industry. He co-founded MIPS Technologies and co-authored the classic textbook with David A. Patterson, on Computer Architecture.

As Stanford faculty he rose to be the Chairman of the Computer Science Department, Dean of the School of Engineering, then Provost and finally the President of Stanford in 2000 (and till date). Hennessy holds a Master’s and Ph.D. in Computer Science from SUNY Stony Brook. He is an IEEE Fellow and was selected to receive the IEEE Medal of Honor in 2012. Hennessey also launched significant activities that helped to foster interdisciplinary research in the biosciences and bioengineering at Stanford.

@ symbol
Ray Tomlinson
Ray Tomlinson

Have you ever considered that someone, at some point, was in a position to choose what symbol would be used separate the user from their location in an email address? That person, it turns out, was Ray Tomlinson, and in 1971 he chose "@". Tomlinson is credited with demonstrating the first email sent between computers on a network, and when asked what inspired him to make this selection he said, “Mostly because it seemed like a neat idea.”

After completing his Master’s degree at MIT in 1965, Ray joined the Information Sciences Division of Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc. of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Since then he has made many notable contributions to the world of network computing. He was a co-developer of the TENEX computer system that was popular in the earliest days of the Internet; he developed the packet radio protocols used in the earliest internetworking experiments; he created the first implementation of TCP; and he was the principle designer of the first workstation attached to the Internet.

Bletchley Park
Dr. Sue Black
Dr. Sue Black

Dr. Sue Black has demonstrated the power of social networking. She used Web 2.0 technologies to help raise awareness of, and critical funding for, Bletchley Park, the UK World War II center for decrypting enemy messages. She has also been an active campaigner for equality and support for women in technology fields, founding a number of online networking platforms for women technology professionals. A keen researcher, Dr. Black completed a PhD in software measurement in 2001. Her research interests focus on software quality improvements. She has recently won the PepsiCo Women's Inspiration Network award, been named Tech Hero by ITPRO magazine and was awarded the first John Ivinson Award from the British Computer Society. In 2011 Dr. Black set up The goto Foundation, a nonprofit organization which aims to make computer science more meaningful to the public, generate public excitement in the creation of software, and build a tech savvy workforce. Read Sue's blog about The goto Foundation: http://gotofdn.org

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