Career Profiles

Explore profiles of real professionals and students to learn how they got started, what they love about computing, and all about the fascinating work they do.
Sajeer Fazil

Sajeer Fazil

Engineer, OpenDSP, Hyderabad, India

Degree(s):

Bachelor of Technology in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from National Institute of Technology Calicut, INDIA
“Look around and see what issues your society faces; Think about how education and technology can help solve such problems. Technology is most valuable when used to enhance society. ”

It all started with an interest in Mathematics. Going forward, the relationship became stronger and inseparable. As an electrical engineering student, it became inevitable for me to explore the practical implications. Thus, I came across various challenges addressed and analyzed with very interesting mathematical concepts. In addition, I took on various hobby projects to start with. Eventually, it directed me to the embedded systems industry. Being in this domain helped me appreciate the important role that algorithms and logic play in the organization and development of such systems.

I am an Embedded Systems Engineer, specialized in multimedia applications. The main attraction of such systems is the way in which they are developed and deployed on end products that reach real people. The challenging nature of video and audio compression and enhancement algorithms is a fascinating aspect of my work. My activities include development of signal processing algorithms on a Digital Signal Processor, as well as handling the framework on the general purpose processor. Working on a technology which can reach the common people, and improve their lifestyle, is highly exciting and satisfying to me.

During the final year in college, my main project was the “Design and Development of a Heart Rate Variability Analyzer”. This involved development of algorithms to analyze patients’ heart rate. It also included implementation of an embedded software system that is based on rigorous mathematical operations within constrained memory. The application was to be managed by a handy-battery-driven device. I was proud to develop a product that helps humanity. It was a project which gave me confidence in choosing a career path as well as understanding the importance of teamwork.

Circuit boards

IEEE robotics workshop presentation

Working on a robotics project

Debugging embedded projects

Browse other profiles

Explore profiles of real professionals and students to learn how they got started, what they love about computing, and all about the fascinating work they do.

Gostin
Nita Patel
Brown
Victor Skowronski
Erickson profile
warford profile
Susan Land
Amittai F. Aviram
Robert Aboukhalil
Joy Buolamwini
David Walden
Andy Stephenson
Eur Ing Sam Raincock
Asad Ullah Naweed
Shuang LIU
Herat Amrish Gandhi
Sajeer Fazil
Punch card from a COBOL program
Jean Sammet

Jean E. Sammet was one of the first developers and researchers in programming languages. During the 1950’s - 1960’s she supervised the first scientific programming group for Sperry Gyroscope Co. and served as a key member of the original COBOL (COmmon Business-Oriented Language) committee at Sylvania Electric Products. She also taught one of the first graduate programming courses in the country at Adelphi College. After joining IBM in 1961, she developed and directed the first FORMAC (FORmula MAnipulation Compiler). This was the first widely used general language and system for manipulating nonnumeric algebraic expressions. In 1979 she began handling Ada activities for IBM’s Federal Systems Division. Ada is a structured, object-oriented high-level computer programming language, designed for large, long-lived applications, where reliability and efficiency are paramount. Jean has a B.A. from Mount Holyoke College and an M.A. from the University of Illinois, both in Mathematics. She received an honorary D.Sc. from Mount Holyoke (1978).

Bletchley Park
Dr. Sue Black
Dr. Sue Black

Dr. Sue Black has demonstrated the power of social networking. She used Web 2.0 technologies to help raise awareness of, and critical funding for, Bletchley Park, the UK World War II center for decrypting enemy messages. She has also been an active campaigner for equality and support for women in technology fields, founding a number of online networking platforms for women technology professionals. A keen researcher, Dr. Black completed a PhD in software measurement in 2001. Her research interests focus on software quality improvements. She has recently won the PepsiCo Women's Inspiration Network award, been named Tech Hero by ITPRO magazine and was awarded the first John Ivinson Award from the British Computer Society. In 2011 Dr. Black set up The goto Foundation, a nonprofit organization which aims to make computer science more meaningful to the public, generate public excitement in the creation of software, and build a tech savvy workforce. Read Sue's blog about The goto Foundation: http://gotofdn.org

Cursor
James Dammann

If you have used a word processor today, moved your mouse on your laptop, dragged an object around on your smartphone, or highlighted a section of text on your tablet, you can thank Jim Dammann. In 1961 during his second year at IBM and just one year after completing his PhD, Jim created the concept of what today we all take for granted -- the cursor. This idea he documented in utilizing the cursor within word processing operations.

After retiring from IBM, Jim went on to inspire future generations of software engineers at Florida Atlantic University. His work there too demonstrated his creativity for he spent considerable effort enhancing their software engineering program by integrating ideas and feedback from local industries into the University curricular. Today, Jim lives in the Westlake Hills west of Austin Texas and spends most of his time in his art studio. He wrote and published The Opaque Decanter, a collection of poems about art, which provided a new view at part of art history.

King's Quest
Roberta Williams

Video games immerse users in a world of high tech thrills, stunning visuals, unique challenges, and interactivity. They enable users to become a warrior princess or a gruesome ghoul, create a virtual persona, or even develop worlds that other gamers can play on. But before the games of today became reality, they were the dreams of a few innovative individuals.

Roberta Williams is considered one of the pioneers of gaming as we know it today. During the 80’s and 90’s along with husband Ken Williams through their company On-Line Systems, she developed some of the first graphical adventure games. These included such titles as Mystery House, Wizard and the Princess and the popular King’s Quest series. Williams also helped introduce more girls and women to the world of gaming by bringing games developed from a woman’s perspective to mainstream market.

Gordon and SenseCam QUT
Gordon Bell
Gordon and SenseCam QUT

Gordon Bell is a pioneering computer designer with an influential career in industry, academia and government. He graduated from MIT with a degree in electrical engineering. From 1960, at Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), he designed the first mini- and time-sharing computers and was responsible for DEC's VAX as Vice President of R&D, with a 6 year sabbatical at Carnegie Mellon University. In 1987, as NSF’s first, Ass't Director for Computing (CISE), he led the National Research Network panel that became the Internet. Bell maintains three interests: computing, lifelogging, and startup companies—advising over 100 companies. He is a Fellow of the, Association of Computing Machinery, Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, and four academies. He received The 1991 National Medal of Technology. He is a founding trustee of the Computer History Museum, Mountain View, CA. and is an Researcher Emeritus at Microsoft. His 3 word descriptor: Computing my life; computing, my life.

Image credits