Career Profiles

Explore profiles of real professionals and students to learn how they got started, what they love about computing, and all about the fascinating work they do.
Shuang LIU

Shuang LIU

Master’s Student, Electronic Engineering and Information Technology, Hannover, Germany

Degree(s):

Bachelor of Engineering, Xidian University, China
“Pay attention to the common things around you, you may get inspiration from anything.”

I owned my first personal computer at eleven. I was interested in playing with computers but did not pay much attention to the theories of computing. When I got a chance to take part in a national programming contest for high school students, I learned programming on my own and gained technical view of computers within half a year. Getting a prize in the contest encouraged me to become a computing student. In college, I studied electronic engineering and computer science. I am continuing my master’s study in Germany and wish to become a computing professional one day.

I spend the most time in University. While I do not have too many classes as a master’s student I still get a lot of challenging tasks. Each week I spend around 15 hours on the computer to complete project work. For a foreign student like me, language is also a challenge. I spend an additional two hours a day to improve my English and German. When I have time, I like to read magazines. Of course, I need some coffee times during work. I will always feel good spending time in the cafeteria.

My hobbies are philately and travel. I like to learn things from different areas and various cultures. Each stamp has its own story. By collecting stamps I learn lots of things from other countries and I hope this will widen my horizons. Besides, I have made many friends who are also interested in collecting stamps. We exchange stamps with each other. Another good way to experience different cultures is to travel. Every time I travel, I gain a lot. I think it is necessary for a computing student to pay attention to diversified things other than only technologies.

Working

Philately

At Leibniz Universität Hannover

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Liz Gerber - Image credit Lisa Beth Anderson

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Gerber's work funded by the US National Science Foundation and the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance has appeared in peer-reviewed journals, including Transactions on Computer Human Interactions, Design Studies, and Organization Science.
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Image credits